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  • Intercâmbio em Bray Irlanda

    BRAY

    Snapshot

    Overview

    Overview

    › Área:

    7.55 km²

    Climate

    Climate

    The climate of the city is very mild and humid, since the classic Irish drizzle constantly hits the city throughout the year. Temperatures can reach -2 ºC in winter and hardly ever exceeds 20 ºC in the summer. In addition, in Ireland you can usually feel like you’re going through all seasons in just one day. So always be prepared carrying with you a coat and an umbrella.

    Lifestyle

    Lifestyle

    Just 30 minutes by bus from Dublin, Bray has the charm and discretion of a quiet, countryside city where you can do almost anything on foot.

    History

    History

    Until the 18th century, Bray was just a small fishing village, so it became a haven for the middle class, fed up with the crowding of Dublin's urban life.
    The city experienced a second moment of economic and social boom when Ireland's first railway line was built around 1800. From the time the city was connected to Dublin in 1855, the city grew even larger, becoming the main resort on the east coast of Ireland.

    Public Transport

    Public Transport

    Getting from the beach to other surrounding cities is easy in Bray because the transport system there is efficient and dynamic. Bray has a rail line (DART Irish Rail) to call his own, with possibilities for routes that operate even at dawn.
    As a student, West 1 recommends that you purchase the Student Lead Card for discounted rates, as well as download transportation services apps. That way you stay connected and get the proper information on the correct route to take.

    Study and Work
    in BRAY

    Bray is located at the mouth of the River Dargle, north of Wicklow County. The region is very close to Dublin, so much so that both belong to the Leinster province. It's one of Ireland's 140 beaches, but it's quite different from the beaches we are used to see in Brasil. This is because the area that would normally be filled with sand is covered with stones. It’s no wonder the tourists mingle with the Irish fighting for space in the lawns on sunny days. In 2018, Bray was awarded the Blue Flag Awards, which attests to water quality and its facilities, with a beachfront filled with outstanding bars and restaurants and surrounded by a jogging track.
    But it’s from the top of Bray Head, over 240 meters high, that you can enjoy the best view of the city, which, besides the sea, houses a huge green area and has ecological and cultural tours. From Bray Head, you can take the Bray Head Cliff Walk, a moderate trail to nearby Greystones Beach.
    If you are the kind of person who’s an extreme sports enthusiast, you can reach the cross, a symbol at the top of Bray Head, through an uneven and steep trail through the woods. There is an alternative easy-to-follow walking route that goes through a local golf club. The Dublin-Wicklow rail line runs along the coast, traveling a few meters from the cliffs for those who prefer to contemplate the landscape without exercising.

    Learn more about studying in BRAY

    Find out why study in Bray with WEST 1

    Informações

    • Why study in Bray

      Although belonging to Dublin's metropolitan area, Bray has attributes of a small-town, with its stores well located in the city center Unlike in the capital, you are unlikely to run into many Brazilians, which is great for a true immersion not only regarding the language but also in Irish culture. Not to mention that when you want to party in the capital, the distance is only 40 minutes by train, with options available even at dawn.

    • 8 Reasons to study in Bray

      1. Students can work 20 hours a week except in June, July, August and September, and from December 15th to January 15th it’s possible to work 40 hours
      2. In 2018, Bray was awarded the Blue Flag Awards, which attests to water quality and its facilities.
      3. Welcoming and polite people, willing to help foreigners
      4. With a privileged location, students can immerse themselves in Irish culture without the interference of many tourists or Brazilians, such as in large cities.
      5. Despite its quiet, country-style lifestyle, Bray is only a 40-minute train ride from Dublin, in case you miss the hustle and bustle every now and then.
      6. There are transport options connecting Bray and Dublin until dawn
      7. You get to see one of the aquariums with the largest varieties of marine species in Europe.
      8. Region that reconciles the beauties of its coastline with the mountains, waterfalls and the mouth of the River Dargle.

    • About Bray

      Belonging to Dublin's metropolitan area, Bray is situated at the mouth of the River Dargle, north of Wicklow County.
      It's one of Ireland's 140 beaches, but it's quite different from the ones we are used to. This is because the area that would normally be filled with sand is covered with stones. It’s no wonder the tourists mingle with the Irish fighting for space in the lawns on sunny days. In 2018, Bray was awarded the Blue Flag Awards, which attests to the water quality and its facilities: public restrooms, jogging track and several good restaurants around.
      To choose Bray as an Irish home is to combine the well-being and quality of a countryside life with the possibility of resorting to the big city whenever you want. Just 40 minutes separates Bray from Dublin by train. Not to mention that smaller cities seem to intensify the exchange experience as they bring the students closer to the local culture.

    • Accommodation in Bray

      Accommodation costs vary according to the state, city and type chosen. But regardless of your destination, when it comes to researching a place to live, always keep in mind the distance from your school and accessibility by public transport. That being said, let's see each type:

      Short term

      Hostels Backpackers

      The hostels are good options for those who want to save money with accommodation. The rooms in general are shared, but there are also rooms for couples and private options. Preferred by young travelers, they have quite relaxed environments, with lots of socialization and therefore are very sought after during high seasons.

      Lodges

      They are kinda like hostels but offer private, couples and group rooms. The environment is less busy and more private than hostels, the prices are a bit more expensive, but still cheaper than hotels.

      Long term

      Homestay

      WEST 1 recommends that, at least for the first few weeks, students stay in a homestay, which are homes of Irish families or immigrants who have been in the country for many years. It’s there that the student begins to have contact with the Irish culture, put into practice what they learn at school, get to know the city and ask questions. To participate in this type of program, families are accredited by the Irish government, which guarantees total safety for the student.

      Shared accommodation

      After the homestay period, the student will already be more familiar with the school and the city. Feeling more independent, the next step is to share an apartment or a room with other students, many of them of different nationalities, which is a great experience and great for improving the language. The rent is usually paid weekly, furthermore it’s important to be aware of any additional fees.

    • Work in Bray

      Many exchange students opt for Ireland for the possibility of reconciling study with regulated work. Most opportunities are available on restaurants, cleaning companies, au-pairs or pubs.
      But the advantage of being close to Dublin, with great transport options, makes it easier for students who live in Bray to apply for positions in their region or move to the capital.

    • Attractions in Bray

      From the top of Bray Head, with its more than 240 meters, you can enjoy the best view of the city and realize that Bray is not only a beach town, but also houses a huge green area and has ecological and cultural walking trails.
      You can reach the cross, symbol spiked at the top of Bray Head, via an uneven and steep trail through the woods. There is an alternative easy-to-follow walking route that goes through the local golf club. The Dublin-Wicklow rail line runs along the coast, traveling a few meters from the cliffs for those who prefer to see the landscape without exercising.
      As with many regions of Ireland, Bray is also very committed to cultural dissemination. Since 2002, the Mairmaids Center has been making the city's entertainment scene busy, acting as a regional reference for artistic events with dance, theater and musical performances.
      Named the third most beautiful garden in the world by National Geographic, Powerscourt Garden is exuberant and a landmark tourist attraction - as the gardens beautify the eighteenth-century Killruddery House, that was home to sixteen generations of the traditional Irish family Brabazon.
      Another must-stop is just a 10-minute walk from the Bray train station. The National Sea Life Center features about 70 freshwater and marine species, many of them fierce and rare, such as the Red-bellied piranha. The visit culminates in a stunning tropical shark lagoon to bring it to a perfect end. In addition to promoting entertainment for tourists around the world, the company also has a very strong role in social responsibility through its charity. In 2017, Sea Life Trust raised more than £300,000 worldwide to support partner projects and organizations, protecting sharks, rays, turtles, whales, dolphins, seahorses, otters and penguins among other sea creatures.

    Did you know?

    • 'Cheers'

      The word “Cheers” is not only used to express good wishes before drinking, but can also be used to say thank you, to greet, etc.

    • 'Cards'

      On commemorative dates the Irish love to exchange decorated cards. The messages received are considered more important than the gift itself.

    • 'Saint Patrick'

      Ireland is one of the few places in the world that has no native snakes due to the Ice Age, as the cold have made the island inhospitable to reptiles. But the Irish attribute this fact to the dexterity of their patron Saint Patrick in hunting down and killing all snakes in a heroic act to protect the island.

    Mapa de BRAY

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