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  • Intercâmbio em Dublin Irlanda

    DUBLIN

    Snapshot

    Overview

    Overview

    › Área:

    115 km²

    Climate

    Climate

    Dublin has a temperate maritime climate with cold winters and mild summers and, in fact, doesn’t honor its reputation of being very rainy. The predominance of high rainfall affects mostly the west side of the country. The Irish capital has less rainy days on average than London. The maximum average temperature in January is 8 °C, while the maximum average temperature in July is 19 °C. The sunny months are usually May and June. The wettest month is usually December, with 76 mm of precipitation. Situated at north latitude, Dublin receives about 20 hours of sunlight during summer, and 9 hours in winter.

    Lifestyle

    Lifestyle

    Cosmopolitan, one of the great international centers, but at the same time with an unambitious and beachy lifestyle.

    History

    History

    Dublin is the capital and largest city of Ireland. Its name means “Dark pool," where River Poddle flows into Liffey River to form a deep pool at Dublin Castle. Located in the province of Leinster, near the east coast, taking a tour through the city's tourist spots and visiting its castles and monuments is to take a close look at the history of a place founded as a Viking settlement and influenced by medieval and Celtic culture.
    Between the 14th and 18th centuries, Dublin was incorporated into the English Crown and eventually became the second city of the British Empire, with one of the oldest universities of the British Isles, Trinity College, founded by Queen Elizabeth I and which remains a reference in education to this day.
    In the early eighteenth century, the kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland were merged into the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. In 1916, however, the Irish organized themselves in central Dublin for what would later be called the Easter Uprising, the most devastating rebellion in Irish history against the British rule. It was six years of struggle that culminated in the independence of part of the island in 1922.
    Dublin is a city that respects its historical heritage, but is at the same time linked to the trends of modernity. All this while maintaining the socioeconomic standard of a developed country.
    From a city that exported many of the labor that built North America, Dublin has become a welcoming place for immigrants from many countries, giving back to the world the opportunity its immigrants had in other countries, giving these people a chance to start over.
    Ireland's largest economic center, Dublin was considered by City Mayors Economics to be the world's fourth richest city by purchasing power and tenth by personal income.
    During the late 1990s, the so-called Celtic Tiger defined the economic boom that led technology giants like Google and Microsoft, as well as pharmaceutical Pfzier to settle in Dublin, creating excellent job opportunities for the most skilled workers.

    Cost of Living

    Cost of Living

    Monthly estimate for one person (without rent): € 845.79

    Public Transport

    Public Transport

    Although the city is not very large in terms of territorial or population extension, transportation in Dublin is a model for large first world metropolises. There are bus line options that cover the entire area between the airport and the city center, both during the day and night.
    Dublin also has regular ferry lines connecting the city with Great Britain. Dublin city center is easy to visit and most of the monuments and major tourist attractions are located in a relatively small area. Dublin also has a light rail system, the Luas, and the Irish railway
    company offers connections with Belfast, United Kingdom, and the major cities of Ireland: Galway, Cork, Kilkenny and Limerick. From these stations also depart the Dart metropolitan trains, which connect Dublin with the municipalities of the east coast of Ireland and other major cities of the country. To see the most emblematic places of the city, there are also tourist buses, such as Dublin Sightseeing and City Tour Hop on Hop off, which allows the visitors to get on and off the bus as many times as they want in the tourist spots.
    To save money, the tip is to use the Leap Card (a prepaid card that works as a local Single Ticket).
    The billing system, however, is different from Brazil, where fares have the same price, regardless of the itinerary. In Ireland, this varies depending on the distance traveled.
    To make billing easier, the bus, Luas and Dart routes are divided into zones. Thus, the fewer regions, the lower the fare paid by the passenger.
    Bus passengers that travel often know how high costs can be at the end of the month when not using the Leap Card. A trip from up to three regions costs 2.10 euros in cash or 1.50 in the prepaid card. For longer trips with more than thirteen regions, the amount rises to 3.30 euros in cash, or 2.60 using the card. The same prices apply to students*.

    *Updated prices from December 2017

    Study and Work
    in DUBLIN

    Whether for its green fields, the mysticism of its goblins and fairies as symbols of luck, Dublin is truly enchanted and enchanting! Founded as a Viking settlement, it’s located in the Leinster province, near the middle east coast point, and is one of the oldest cities in Europe.
    With about 550,000 inhabitants, the city is divided into districts, ranging from numbers 1 to 24. Cut in the middle by the River Liffey, the odd-numbered districts are located to the north, while those identified by even numbers are to the south. As a general rule, the smaller the number, the closer to the city center you will be.
    Cosmopolitan city, while still preserving its roots, Dublin is a place where past and future merge in harmony. Among medieval monuments, the capital emanates the energy of its predominantly young population (most are between 15 and 49 years old) and is eager for innovation and technology.
    Amid the modernity of the city that was chosen by multinationals to be their headquarters in Europe, you get to see the oldest pub on the continent. Founded in 1198, Brazen Head is older than Brazil, but still full of charms, and the Irish keep it well preserved, with its colorful flower boxes that invite tourists to visit. And you? How can you resist it?

    Learn more about studying in DUBLIN

    Find out why study in Dublin with WEST 1

    Informações

    • Why study in Dublin

      Ireland's leading educational hub, Dublin is home to two major universities: the University of Dublin and Trinity College, which date from the 16th century.
      The city has three institutes of technology, two of arts and design, not to mention a business school, among other subjects offered by other higher education institutions.
      There are 20 tertiary level institutes in the city. There are also private institutions that benefit students interested in improving their English.

    • 8 Reasons to study in Dublin

      1. Brazilian students can work 20 hours a week (and full-time during vacations);
      2. Headquarters of multinationals in the technology and pharmaceutical industry segments
      3. Government incentives with scholarships to foreign students
      4. Cultural festivals all year long filling the student's cultural agenda;
      5. Full of parks and green areas;
      6. Extensive cycle paths
      7. Mild climate;
      8. Its historical monuments are a trip back to the Medieval Era.
    • About Dublin

      With about 550,000 inhabitants, Dublin is divided into districts, ranging from numbers 1 to 24. Cut in half by the River Liffey, the odd-numbered districts are located to the north, while those identified by even numbers are to the south. As a general rule, the smaller the number, the closer to the city center you will be.
      The Temple Bar area in Dublin 2 is perfect for backpackers and wanderers who enjoy going clubbing. With several bars and restaurants, there is always something to do there at any time of the day. Located in a prime area - just cross the River Liffey to get to the city center - and close to many public transport options, the surroundings of Temple Bar offers numerous hostels and budget accommodation options. Staying in a hotel in the area is also a great way to see many attractions on foot - from Guinness Storehouse to Dublin Castle.
      Cosmopolitan city, while still preserving its roots, Dublin is a city where past and future merge in harmony. Among medieval monuments, the capital pulsates the energy of its predominantly young population (most are between 15 and 49 years old) eager for innovation and technology.
      Amid the modernity of the city that was chosen by multinationals to be their headquarters in Europe, you get to see the oldest pub on the continent. Founded in 1198, Brazen Head is older than our Brazil, but still very charming, and the Irish keep it well preserved, with its colorful flower boxes that invite tourists to visit. It’s impossible to resist!

    • Work in Dublin

      The Irish law ensures that Brazilian students enrolled in English courses, with a minimum of 25 weeks of classes and a 15-hour workload per week, can legally work up to 20 hours per week, during the period they attend school, and up to 40 hours per week during school holidays.
      In Dublin, the industries that employ the most are food and hospitality, which include bars, restaurants, cafes, pubs and hotels. There are also opportunities available such as au pair and baby sitting. With the arrival of multinationals, especially in the technological and pharmaceutical segment, there are also opportunities for qualified professionals in the most diverse areas.

    • Attractions in Dublin

      The hometown of the Guinness beer and its thousands of pubs and ballads also host major traditional festivals that vary in theme depending on the season. It can be religious, musical, art, fashion, food, beverage, book fair, etc. The important thing for this party people is to get together with friends and celebrate.
      The most popular party in town is Saint Patrick's Day, one of Ireland's patrons, which is usually celebrated on March 17th. From families to groups of friends, packed with lots of beer and Irish Coffee, they all take to the streets of Dublin in costumes or with their faces painted, in a kind of carnival. “Marching bands”, as they are called, rock the city on this highly acclaimed day.
      In addition to large inflatable dolls, the show includes street theater, circus performers, and even screening of Irish films, shows and various games.
      In May, the Dublin City Soul Festival takes place in various points of the Irish capital offering music, theater, dance and workshops. The cool thing is that you don’t have to pay to enjoy the attractions and the event also raises funds for children's charities that provide musical education for children and young people.
      Once exclusive to England, Longitude takes place at Marlay Park and brings together artists from around the world on a weekend for you to enjoy great music surrounded by nature.

    Did you know?

    • 'School'

      Boys and girls study in separate colleges after primary school;

    • 'Young'

      With 50% of the population between 15 and 49 years old, Dublin is considered a young city;

    • 'Peaceful'

      On routine patrols the police don’t carry guns and guard the streets with only tickets to note the infringements.

    • 'Ancient'

      The Brazen Head pub is older than Brazil. Founded in 1198!

    • 'Dark side'

      Dublin means "black pool" in Gaelic, the old local language

    • 'Locals'

      Dubliners is the slang used to nickname the locals.

    Mapa de DUBLIN

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